Found a cool kids’ store – Torly Kid

I’ve had a couple of days to get my head around the US election results, and have been looking about me a bit more than usual to see how New York has reacted. On Friday my eye was caught by this particularly timely and inspirational sandwich board on the street, quoting Hillary Clinton: “Diversity is a strength, not a weakness. If we lift each other up, we can make each other stronger.” It was outside Torly Kid, a tiny kids’ boutique on Hudson & Duane Street in Tribeca, and I decided to pop in.

I’m so glad I did. Continue reading “Found a cool kids’ store – Torly Kid”

10 reasons to live in Battery Park City with kids

Teardrop Park
Teardrop Park

One of the most daunting things about moving a young family to New York (especially as an expat) is picking where to live. Manhattan, Brooklyn, or way out in Connecticut? If Manhattan, which part? Each neighbourhood has a really distinctive personality, and you want to get it right. After a great deal of street-pounding and house-hunting by C, we ended up picking Battery Park City.
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The Mysterious Bookshop

The Mysterious Bookshop
The Mysterious Bookshop

Have found such a beautiful bookshop in Tribeca, it warrants a blog post all to itself. Called The Mysterious Bookshop, it only stocks crime, mysteries and thrillers. Floor to ceiling shelves, with those tempting old school wooden ladders on rails so you can reach the very top. There’s a huge section devoted to Sherlockiana (that’s Sherlock Holmes to you and me), and much of the stock is signed by the author.
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Learning the modes of transport

Been here nearly four weeks now, and have been trying out the different modes of transport. There’s a brilliant free, air conditioned Connection Bus which runs a loop Downtown through Battery Park City, Tribeca and Sea Port. V handy for nipping around with the girls when it’s hot. Only downside is you always have to collapse the pram, even if the bus is practically empty – not cool when it’s heaped with bags, scooters, and a sleeping toddler. But despite that, it’s still our favourite. T loves to pull the yellow bell rope to request a stop, and solomnly calls out “Thank you, driver” when she clambers down to the pavement.

The Metro is our least favourite, so far. It feels grimy, far too hot, and borderline scary when the trains whizz past on both sides of your narrow platform. While the trains themselves are (usually) air conditioned, you get pretty scorched by the hot winds on the platform. It’s particularly hard to navigate with a pram – most stations have flight after flight of steep steps, and precious few elevators. The ticket barriers are also really hard. Apparently you’re supposed to leave the pram, swipe your card, nip through the  turnstile and then rush back through the emergency exit gate to retrieve your child, holding it open with your foot so you can push them through. Luckily I’ve had C with me each time so one of us has stayed with B, but I’d be really uncomfortable leaving her in the pram while I ran round. The answer would probably be to unclip her and carry her with me, but either way it’s difficult and stressful.  In fact, I think I’d use my beloved Ergo baby carrier if I had to do it on my own.
Continue reading “Learning the modes of transport”